in Becoming an Expert

You Don’t Have To Be The Best To Be An Expert

There is a common misconception that in order to become an expert you need to be perceived as the best.

If you had to be the best to be an expert there would only be one expert at:

  • Basketball (Jordan? Bird? Magic?)
  • Piano (Mozart? Beethoven? Chopin?)
  • Running a Tech Company (Gates? Jobs? Dell?)
  • Painting (Monet? Raphel? Da Vinci?)
  • Stand-Up Comedy (Carlin? Williams? Pryor?)
  • Chess (Fischer? Kasporov? Deep Blue?)

I dare you to try and┬ápick the best out of those categories and say that the others aren’t experts.

Which brings me to my next point.

There Are Already Experts at Everything

Whatever you are trying to get better at, there are most likely already people that are perceived as experts at it. (Notice I said perceived, and not just “are”. Tricking people into thinking you are an expert is a very common ploy and not something that I’d advocate doing.)

Instead of viewing this fact as a reason not to pursue becoming better at something, use it as a reason to push harder. You can see what kind of potential opportunities you will have if you get to the top, have someone to look up to, and study the mistakes they’ve already made.

Don’t strive to be the best. Strive to always be getting better and you’ll eventually become the best.

You Don’t Have to Wait for Permission

Like it says on our manifesto:

“You don’t have to wait for permission, and you don’t need anyone else to grant you status.”

You grant yourself permission. You give yourself status.

Quit waiting and start doing.


Corbett Barr

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